3 Types of Motivation and 1 Type of Irony

20150616_071256Life with a Little is the busiest I have ever experienced. College got pretty busy, but my homework didn’t wake me up at night unless I had a high-pressure exam the next day. So now that I’m sleeping much less than I would like (thank you, Little’s lower central incisors) I have set some pretty high goals for myself: finish the second draft of my novel. Soon. If I’m going to succeed, I need as much motivation as I can get. Thankfully, I have three types:

Now or Never

One good thing about being so busy is that my mindset is always “work now, or else you’ll never get to it.” There is no room for procrastination. It’s ironic, but I just might get more written now that I don’t have free time.

My goal is to finish editing my first act by New Years (or by Christmas if at all possible) and the next two acts by March. If I don’t work on it every day, I will fall behind. So I can at least take some time during Little’s naps or while he plays happily in the morning. There is time, I just need to find it and steal it away from other tasks like dishes and laundry.

Competition

These goals are also part of a competition. Even though ‘now or never’ gets me going pretty well, my internal motivation isn’t strong enough to withstand sleep deprivation. To battle this, I am competing with a writing group friend. We both set the same two due dates and we’ll trade our works by the end.

Expectant Readers

As if this wasn’t enough, another friend demanded that I let her read the novel at the end. If I didn’t trust her to handle my novel well I wouldn’t even consider sending it to her, but she is a conscientious person who I’m sure will be able to give a thoughtful critique. This also gives me a good excuse to print off the whole manuscript, which is always satisfying. Having few readers will help me meet my deadlines, and their notes will give me clearer direction for draft three.

Though each form of motivation helps keep me going, I still have some serious time restrictions no matter how determined I am to write. So wish me luck! I’m going to need it.

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Big-Picture Work for the Detail Oriented

DSC00642I’ve avoided it for a long time. A long long long time. But this week I finally knuckled down, put in the hours, and tracked the timeline of my entire book.

The novel’s grunt-work really didn’t deserve such epic procrastination, but somehow I kept pushing the novel forward instead of stopping and figuring it all out. No damage done, thankfully, but now that I’m on the other side of the process, I wonder what all the fuss was all about.

For those of you who feel like 85,000 words is difficult to keep track of, find hope here Continue reading

From the Forge: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

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Writing today from StoryForge Productions:

Last week, the Club discussed The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie. The classic whodunit is light on its toes—the perfect read to offset the longer, heavier texts that we have chosen lately. The only element lacking from our evening of laughter, wine and murder was a round of Clue…

Read more at the Forge!

The Freelancer’s Polar Bear Club: Diving in Headfirst

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Ripped mercilessly off their shelves, books congregate by color. Homesickness sets in as they wait for their turn with the  camera.

Last week when the hubby came home from work, a mess of books sprawled across the dining table. He asked; I explained:

When I quit my semi-traditional salaried job last month, I decided to dive headfirst into freelancing. I bought a domain. I shot pictures for the website’s headers–discovering that that green books have too many tones to match well, but blue and red are nicely uniform. Superfluities aside, Continue reading

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davidfarland:

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About five years ago I looked at the future of publishing and felt … deeply worried. The rise in the sale of e-readers heralded both opportunities and concerns. You see, there aren’t a lot of avid readers in the world. About 40 percent of the people in the US won’t read a book this year—or…

Why I’m no Long Cautiously Optimistic about the Future of Publishing

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…I really stretched the budget to try to make it work but the reality was simply more expensive—kind of the equivalent of jamming a square peg in a round hole.

Novelist Kelly Thompson, author of The Girl Who Would Be King and Storykiller, on her experiences with self-publishing and Kickstarter. See the full interview at StoryForge Productions!

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I had the good fortune to interview Kelly Thompson, author of The Girl Who Would Be King and Storykiller. She gives some great advice to aspiring novelists and shares the ups and downs of her journey! 

An Interview with Novelist Kelly Thompson, Part 1

Focus, Discipline, and Silence

Sometimes I have to trick my brain into focusing to get some good writing time. Yesterday I put the earbuds in. And that’s all, really. No music. They weren’t even plugged into the computer. They separated me from wave of distractions just enough to create a small bubble of focus. The magical effects lasted for an hour and then I moved on to the work that I’m actually paid to do 😉

And now, this morning, it’s time to tackle chapter 11 again.

How do you get yourself to plunk down and focus on your writing?

StoryForge Productions: Our 2014 Rocket to the Moon

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In this video, StoryForge introduces many of the new projects that are coming out this year! Please watch, and keep an eye on the website and Facebook page for updates!

As you can probably tell, the people working on StoryForge are passionate about their craft and excited to help you actualize your dreams. And yes, I am in this video. I haven’t done much filming before, so it’s always an interesting experience. And fun, because the StoryForge peoples are always fun.