Harry Potter and Rowling’s Story Soundscape

hogwarts_teach_us_something_please_by_albus119-d57sgo9Recently I discussed how learning styles match writing styles, and since then I’ve been more alert to writers’ use of the senses. As I read I ask myself, does the author linger with visuals, jump ahead into action, or take advantage of every sound? Which element is predominant? Inspired by Claire Saag’s guest post for StoryForge, I picked up Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

You know what I discovered? Sounds. Everywhere.

If you can, recall the scene where Harry first meets Hagrid. Boom, crash, smash! Sounds bring the chapter to life. When Rowling isn’t describing the howling wind or sizzling sausages, she plays her characters vocal chords like musical instruments. Continue reading

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The Key to Finding a Writer’s Strengths – What’s Your Learning Style?

DSC00302I have been asking my writing friends all week: what is your learning style? Some say they are distinctly kinesthetic. They hoard memories creating their own sign language to accompany a poem. Or they are auditory, and learn best by listening to lectures.

Personally, I am very visual. I remember names best after seeing them spelled out. In my university classes, I was a notorious doodler. I live my life in accumulated moments and my understanding of history is grounded in webbed associations between art, books, and stiff portraits of important figures.

Your learning style affects your writing style. Continue reading