Crafting a Practicable Plan for the Editing Process

Editing is eternally fascinating. When you approach the second draft of your novel, you’re a lioness crouching in the grass, watching her prey, biding her time, and planning the kill. For a successful hunt, you must analyze the situation thoroughly.

In “3 Steps to a Sustainable and Streamlined Editing Process,” I help you start the process of crafting a practicable plan. And to my nerdy glee, I get to dig into three main editing stages over the next two weeks. The editing process is complex, messy, and exhausting–but completely worthwhile.

Stay tuned, and visit StoryForge Productions to keep up!

When people ask how my writing is going…

DSC00723… I start to list all my projects and explain why they’re exciting. With a varied, ever shifting workload, there’s always an update on ongoing projects or a few new ones to catch them up on. Soon their eyes glaze over. My work isn’t exactly a predictable 9-5. Every day is vastly different than the next, so I have much more to talk about than they expected. After a while they grasp onto the one thing they know I’ve got going on: “Are you still working on the same novel?”

Unless you’re the type to pop one out every year or to toss your draft when something better comes along, novels are long term commitments. So yes, I’m working on the same novel.

Writing is my life. It’s strange to start answering someone’s question and then immediately realize that the person really has no idea what I’m talking about. I’m sure that people in a lot of fields feel that. I really have no idea what my Dad is talking about when he gets into technical jargon–sometimes far before the jargon even starts coming out. (Sorry Dad!) So how do we talk about our lives and our work in a way that helps others understand?

For me, I feel like I ought to condense my explanation. Maybe give the broad scope: I write for print and online magazines, I’m working on two books, and I freelance edit on the side. (Even that sounds like a mouthful, but believe me, that’s the short version.) And then I should focus on whatever they seem most interested in.

Do you come across this problem? How do you explain your work?

 

Friday Reflections: Write Your Heart Out

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Let’s start writing! …just give me a minute make some tea, okay?

Since I’ve been talking a lot about business and freelancing lately, I thought that today I should get back to my roots. Here are a few writing challenges to get you going:

2014 April PAD Challenge: FAQs (and Tips)” – Though we’re a few days late with this peom-a-day challenge, Robert Lee Brewer from Writer’s Digest encourages writers to try their hand at a few stanzas. The challenge can teach you a lot about the art and discipline of writing, so you might as well sneak a look and take a shot! Continue reading

StoryForge Productions: Our 2014 Rocket to the Moon

Video

In this video, StoryForge introduces many of the new projects that are coming out this year! Please watch, and keep an eye on the website and Facebook page for updates!

As you can probably tell, the people working on StoryForge are passionate about their craft and excited to help you actualize your dreams. And yes, I am in this video. I haven’t done much filming before, so it’s always an interesting experience. And fun, because the StoryForge peoples are always fun.

Book Club

I always thought that book clubs were for rich middle aged women who had nothing better to do. I have no idea where I got that notion, because I just started my own book club last month! I realized their value: community with good friends, and exploration into good fiction.

I had no idea how to start one, or what to do when I did, but I emailed a bunch of girls and off we went! Are you interested in anything like this? Because really, it’s quite incredibly simple:

  1. Email people.
  2. Meet and pick a book. (We’re reading The Help right now)
  3. Read the book.
  4. Meet a month later.
  5. Talk about the book.
  6. Pick another book. (Not sure what’s next yet—we’ll see!)
  7. Repeat.

However simple that sounds, the one difficult task is picking the book. Still haven’t gotten that part down yet. We have so many tastes and opinions: sci-fi, mystery, classics, pop-fic, dystopia, memoirs. The list goes on. So much wonderful diversity—but it makes it difficult to find something that everyone will enjoy. 

To you all out there, the floor is open: Any tips on how to pick books? Or any recommendations?