Multi-Disciplinary Creativity at its Core

Coming-Soon-Image2The process of creativity has always fascinated me. It’s not centered around one approach or one medium; creativity is a conglomerate of experiences that form how you process raw information and how those thoughts catch your imagination.

Last fall my analysis of creativity took the form of an outline, and, after months of planning, formatting, and editing with my team, the book is nearly finished. Since the content is multi-disciplinary at heart, Allison Oh paired beautiful photography with each chapter.

Throughout FireStarters you’ll dig to the core of creativity, free from confining rules or expectations, and explore your unique process. You’ll delve into your internal understanding and explore the ever inspiring world beyond. Learn more about the FireStarters Ebook here, and preorder for a 15% discount.

Recap: Your Complete Editing Strategy

magnifying glass on bookWhen I first started writing, I was a slave to perfectionism. Imagine a 15 year-old Sarah, scribbling all over her ten-page manuscript and perfecting each word before moving the plot forward. I don’t advise that method, but I can say that my fascination with editing started there. In the years since, I’ve enjoyed analyzing when to start self-critique and how to progress efficiently.

With this analysis at hand, I had the privilege of discussing editing with StoryForge Productions. The articles below offer a big-picture view of editing; it’s the best place to start if you want to make it to the end sans mental breakdown. That may be overly dramatic, but editing is a very difficult experience–which is why I also discuss when you should consider hiring an editor (see last article). Take a deep breath and explore the editing process.

3 Steps to a Sustainable and Streamlined Editing Process: “Editing a book is a monstrous process. Many dreamy eyed romantics start their novel with gusto and struggle to the finis, only to realize just how much work it’ll take to make a 50,000 to 90,000-word manuscript readable and enjoyable…”

Strategic Breakdown: The Developmental Edit“Before you get into each detail, you’ve got to step back and grasp the big picture. This is the first step of the editing process: understand your manuscript’s strengths and weaknesses from start to finish. And I’m not thinking about grammar or even prose. I’m thinking big. Plot arc big…”

Strategic Breakdown: The Line Edit“Though the line edit is more detail-oriented than the developmental, it can be just as intense. The next step down from big-picture work is surprisingly steep. You’ll find yourself surrounded by individual scenes, but you can’t forget the overall flow yet. Seemingly small details are more important than you think…”

Strategic Breakdown: The Copy Edit“With developmental edits and line edits taken care of, you’re finally to the point where you don’t have to worry about big-picture plot arcs. All that’s left is detailed prose and grammar work. You’re still not to proofreading level, but considering the toil that you’ve gone through so far, the copy edit is minor. You simply need to clean up the rubble after renovation…”

When is it Time for an Editor?“Every writer comes to a point when he or she grows too close to a story to see its flaws. I remember coming to that point with a few undergrad essays—after many tired stabs at revision, I would print it off and hand it to a sympathetic housemate. And that was only for a ten-pager…”

Exciting New Directions

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Rosie always encourages me to keep pressing onward. She’s pretty awesome like that.

About this time last year, I was prepping lesson plans and reviewing notes. But as this school year begins, I’m staying home. My writing projects have doubled. And alongside the ones that I listed in my last post, I’ll also be working on the second draft of my novel. It’s so exciting to be able to do this full time. 

With all of these projects, I have less time for blogging. When I started in 2010, my goal was to foster creativity, help fellow writers, and practice the craft. But my creative energy has many outlets. I write weekly for StoryForge Productions and I love the community there, because I can regularly help fellow creatives with articles like “Micro Pacing: How to Time your Dialogue.” The number of large, long-term projects that I’m working with means that I’m practicing the craft daily. Now that I list everything out like this, it seems that the blog is obsolete. But really?

Where does that leave the blog?

The blog and I have had 4 good years, and I’m not going to ditch it just because I’m entering a new stage in my career. It needs a new direction, a more casual and personal angle. I am going to spend lest time on my posts, but that won’t make them less meaningful. I still want to partner with fellow writers wherever I go and be a helpful resource. Thank you for hanging with me thus far! I hope to enrich the writing community as I share my journey with you. 

Just in case you didn’t know…I love writing

I have had a lot of fun the past few weeks, and I’m working on lots of projects:

  1. Writing a new book. Non-fiction. I’ll update you on that when the time is right 🙂
  2. Now working with editors in the lifestyle and food groups of my company, so learning the ropes over there and loving it
  3. Joined Twitter so that @storyforgers fans could ask me questions directly at @sarahlyoon
  4. Still working on StoryForge articles every week

….and apparently I’m ignoring my blog, which is very sad.

With all of this going on, I feel so blessed to be able to pursue a career in writing. When I was 10, I just knew that I wanted to tell stories and read books. In high school, I started writing a novel. And in college, I realized that I could indeed get paid for writing if I tried. And now–I am! I’m constantly surprised by how much I love writing, even when the most unexpected assignments come my way.

With all of these changes, I feel like it’s finally time to adjust the blog’s focus–but it’s midnight, I’ll have to discuss that next time 😉

The Business of Art: Staying in Love with your Craft

Sometimes I critique books as I read. Though some prose surprises me with its artistry and rhetoric, other styles snag. My mind has been trained to edit and critique, so nit-picking has become involuntary and even burdensome. When I pick the book up again, I rebel against my education and force my brain to shut down. The gears slow; I can finally enjoy the story.

I’m not the only one with this problem, I know. Recently a friend’s child announced that she wanted to be a chocolate taster when she grew up. One wise adult quickly discouraged her… Read More at StoryForge Productions…