NaNoWriMo is a Tool. Use it. Love it. Learn.

IMG_20171129_090726_063I won NaNoWriMo! 50,296 words in 30 days. Celebration mode activated.

To those who didn’t get to 50k this year, everyone wins if they play it right. And I don’t mean participation ribbons and a half-hearted hurrah. NaNoWriMo is like golf. (Didn’t see that one coming, did ya?) You’re a lone athlete, always trying to improve your swing and put under par. It’s a mental game and, no matter how much competition is around you, you’re still playing against yourself.

Even if you stop at 10k, you might get more out of the month than someone who wrote 75k. The difference is in how much you challenged yourself. I tried NaNoWriMo during a few of my college years and burned out between 20k and 30k. Each time I learned a little more about my writing process. With the help of a few big failures and many small victories, 50k doesn’t feel impossible anymore. As long as nothing drastic comes up in my life, surviving November is just a matter of focusing. This year especially, I won because I learned. November was my chance for introspection.

The Rogue Participant

Introspection isn’t something that many would link with NaNoWriMo, the month from hell, when you type until your fingers bleed. But this year I played the game differently. I was halfway through draft 2 of my WIP, so I didn’t have a new novel write. I held onto the key rule of the challenge, 50,000 new words, and went rogue in all else. I titled my novel “Experiments in Pantsing” and wrote this summary:

A variety of (hopefully dynamic) protagonists fight their limitations, traveling across genres the way high fantasy elves traverse forests and shivering through POV shifts as quickly as the weather changes in their imaginary land. Their pain is the writer’s gain. It’s time to storm through comfort zones and confront qualms, because why else would I force myself to write 50k in one month?

I had a number of inhibitions that I needed to break through. This was my chance. On day one I wasn’t sure where to start, because my project was so nebulous, but what ended up spilling into my document was most perfect mess I could ask for.

  • 24,000 went to a rewrite of my current novel’s act 3.
  • 10,000 went to short stories.
  • 16,000 went to brainstorming, analysis, research, and outlines.

Some out there will see this as a copout, because I did not write 50,000 words of one novel, but that’s okay. I usually over-prescribe shoulds and oughts, establishing rules that keep me linear, keep me focused, and keep me from the creative freedom that I would otherwise enjoy. This year I told myself to cut it out. I granted myself permission to write what I actually wanted to write. Stream of conscious pages led to character creation, plot formation, and, best of all, problem solving. My best ah-ha moments came from three realizations:

  1. Stream of consciousness helps silence your inner editor.

NaNoWriMo tells us not to edit as we go. However hard we try to follow that advice, most of us filter our thoughts even before our fingers tap the keys. When I wrote 50,000 last year, I was the perfect rule-following participant. I didn’t waste words on anything that wasn’t narrative, and that was my biggest mistake. I didn’t step aside from narrative to make room for brainstorming. My scenes were mushy and directionless. This year, I listened to those nagging questions. When they came up, I let stream of consciousness guide me. Once I even stopped half-way through a paragraph and yelled at myself in all caps:

WHY CAN’T I JUST GET ON WITH THIS SCENE? I’VE GOT THIS BLOCK AGAINST SUCH DEEP CONFLICT. HOW CAN I WRITE REAL TENSION? REAL CONSEQUENCES? REAL MISTAKES? REAL ANGER? REAL HURT?

Aren’t caps obnoxious? Somehow it felt necessary. I needed to knock something loose in my brain. This freedom let it rip came from Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird and Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones. It’s hard to get to the heart of your issues if cloak them in narrative. Your characters can wait. Sometimes you’ve got to drop the act and see what comes out. Be honest with yourself. Your narrative, when you get back to it, will be so much better for it.

  1. Stop and ask for directions; your characters are happy to help.

Sometimes you’ve just got to write through the pain, but I couldn’t do that this year. It wasn’t helpful or productive. Instead of relying on intuition and sheer force of will to push me through the scene, I stopped—my intuition isn’t the greatest, anyway—and considered my options.

This is where the 16,000 words of brainstorming became very very helpful. I listed out all of my characters’ options, even the ones that seemed super duper dumb. (Dumb is kind of my favorite word right now. I don’t even know why.) I set every thought loose. I highlighted the ones that didn’t work and clicked strikethrough. Soon there was only one left. It felt right, even though it was toward the bottom of the list. I’ve heard someone give this type of advice before, maybe one of the Writing Excuses podcasts, but I’d never put it into practice before. About time, right? It was so very helpful.

  1. Short stories are good punching bags.

Apologies to short story and flash fiction writers everywhere, but I used your art form as rough-it-up training. It was a low-risk way for me to test out the story elements that scare me spitless.

My current WIP had a weak, soft-focus ending. It was a flabby first draft. I knew that it needed to change, but I was too afraid to get it wrong. So I wrote a little story. The story was okay, but for some reason I didn’t feel like finishing it. Instead of jumping ship, I asked myself why:

I’m getting bored with this. The set up does not match the fallout, and it’s still very internal. The threats are in the distance, rather than in her face. If she was just told the truth then it would be able to amp up more quickly. Here I am veiling the threat, and I really don’t have a true threat in mind. That is not enough. That is not enough.

As I wrote, I discovered an undercover habit, the elusive type that’s way too good at playing ding dong ditch. My storytelling needed a boost. My process needed to change. To fix these issues, I had to finish my WIP by the end of NaNoWriMo and punch my antagonist in the face. And so I did.

Are You a Rogue?

While I don’t want to encourage rule bending/breaking for its own sake, I want you to find the unnecessary shoulds and oughts that are weighing you down. Yours probably look different than mine, but we’ve all got them.

As you write over the next 11 months, be aware of the emotional barriers that hold you back from forming good stories, or the psychological disconnects between you and your characters. Consider why you avoid certain genres, personalities, conflicts, etc. Gather up all of those issues and use NaNoWriMo 2018 to help you process. 50,000 words is plenty of space to spill it all out and see what you can change. Be vulnerable, get introspective, and learn.

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On NaNoWriMo, Productivity, & Anne Lamott

I hit 50k last week. I did a fist pump or two and promised myself that I’d keep writing 1k a day until Christmas. I’d have a full 90k draft to celebrate on Christmas morning, in the midst of stockings and cinnamon rolls.

Guess what? I haven’t written anything since then. Instead,  I spent a week editing on super speed for a client and, despite the super speed, it was super fun. So I’m a little off track, but I still have my eye on that 90k. Why? Writing has become part of my DNA. If I’m not writing a story, I’m editing one. If I’m not editing, I’m outlining. Brainstorming. Researching. Etc.

One of the best things you can do for yourself is to keep moving forward. Keep writing, creating, playing, reading, dreaming, researching, and–believe me–analyzing. When you stay productive, the habitual cycle of consuming and creating will help you grow.

Stephen King’s On Writing encourages (almost demands) that you write every day. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott also encourages a productivity-centric mindset, but in a more poetic way.

Writing has so much to give, so much to teach, so many surprises. That thing you had to force yourself to do–the actual act of writing–turns out to be the best part. It’s like discovering that while you thought you needed the tea ceremony for the caffeine, what you really needed was the tea ceremony. The act of writing turns out to be its own reward (xxvi).

While I am still very publication/end goal/word count focused, it’s good to be reminded that the messy and challenging process is worth cherishing. Productivity isn’t just a means to an end, just as my life isn’t just a means to an end. Every day, even with all the mush and mundanity, is valuable. Those moments when I stare at the wall, wondering how the heck I’m going to get my character out of this life-and-death situation, I’m still doing valuable work. It’s all part of the process.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to extend my writing break for another day and read the next chapter of Bird by Bird. 

 

NaNo Day 2: Face That Monster

It’s only day 2 and I’m already seeing discouragement in some WriMos. Maybe that’s the fate of a pantser (says the perfectionist-overkill-planner) or maybe that’s just life for you right now. It’s busy!

There are many obstacles between you and 50k: time limitations, mental distractions, unclear writing goals, underdeveloped characters…etc etc etc.

Your job is to realize what your obstacles are before they block you for good. What is making 1667 per day so agonizing? Dig into your own psyche, schedule, or novel outline. If you can face that monster, then you can face 50k. You can do this.

I shared this article with my writing group a while back, and I’d like to share it with you too: “How I Went From Writing 2,000 Words a to 10,000 Words a Day.” It’s all about analyzing your own process, knowing how you work best, and running with it. Seriously, if you’re struggling at all, check it out.

My day 2 so far: I knocked out 1k this morning and I hope to write 1.5 more later today, which means finishing scene 2 and starting scene 3. I have the content all ready; I just need to be okay with it spilling out on the page in an unappealing pile of words. Mess is okay? Mess is okay. Mess is OKAY. (My mantra for the month, haha)